Tag Archives: SPOT

IgnitionOne Adds Support for News Feed Ad Unit on FBX in its Digital Marketing Suite

IgnitionOne is excited to announce a couple of new updates to its Facebook offering:

  • Added support of Page post link ads within News Feed through Facebook Exchange (FBX)
  • Gave marketers the ability to serve consumers a personalized News Feed ad that aligns with their interests with a Dynamic Creative functionality within the Digital Marketing Suite (DMS)

These updates to the DMS give marketers even more ways to reach consumers by leveraging high-profile ad units and displaying relevant messages by using creative that shows products they have engaged with or demonstrated interest in.

Marketers are now able to:

  • Apply predictive portfolio optimization with News Feed ads using SPOT®
  • Create custom Facebook Page posts and News Feed ads within the DMS
  • Customize the creative unit with dynamic insertion of product images, names, descriptions, and pricing
  • Provide organic advertising opportunities by integrating social features (Like, Share, Comment) with display targeted ads

Facebook News Feed ad support is backed by IgnitionOne’s powerful media optimization and DSP capabilities, a part of the integrated DMS, which helps marketers spend smarter, work easier and improve performance. These solutions help marketers manage and optimize paid and natural search, display and Facebook advertising, supported by cross-channel attribution alongside site optimization capabilities that present the right message at the right time to website visitors.

IgnitionOne is a Facebook Preferred Marketing Developer (PMD) for Ads.

Facebook® is a registered trademark of Facebook Inc.

IgnitionOne Introduces Display Capabilities for SPOT Predictive Optimization

Yesterday we announced the industry’s first predictive optimization tool for programmatic display advertising, also known as SPOT, which is an update to IgnitionOne’s Digital Marketing Suite (DMS).

First to offer Predictive Portfolio Optimization for search advertising with SPOT a decade ago, we’re excited to be able to expand this technology within a rapidly growing programmatic display space.

SPOT not only gives marketers the unique ability of forecasting how their campaigns will perform relative to varying budgets, it also automatically optimizes bids at an individual user-level to drive the most conversions at the lowest ad spend.

For its beta, we worked with Motel 6, whose initial test results proved extremely promising as SPOT was revealed to deliver conversions at over 30% less cost when compared to non-SPOT optimized display campaigns. In addition, SPOT drove a 16% increase in conversions within the first 24 hours of impression delivery and a 167% increase in click-based conversions overall.

“Delivering the right message to the right person in the most efficient way helps us connect travelers to clean, comfortable rooms at the most cost-effective price,” said Lance Miceli, Chief Marketing Officer of Motel 6, the national lodging chain and SPOT beta partner. “SPOT’s predictive optimization capability has the potential to be a game changer for our display advertising, especially when it comes to budgeting and how we allocate media buys.”

To learn more about SPOT for Display, click here.

Sabermetrics & Search Bid Management; ‘Moneyballing’ the Market

It took some time for the baseball world to accept the forward thinking Bill James. His work in advanced statistics, now known as sabermetrics, attempts to quantify all aspects of baseball to determine why teams win and lose. James’ approach has been highly contested since the late 70’s, but is now becoming widely accepted as a stat revolution in baseball.

My curiosity with Search Engine Marketing (SEM) grew with the acceptance and advancement of sabermetrics in Major League Baseball in the early 2000’s. The similarities between SEM and baseball seemed quite natural to me and easy to correlate. You have a batter and a pitcher, similarly representative of your ad and a consumer. At-bats are impressions, hits are clicks, home runs are conversions and so forth. Slightly more quantifiable stats in baseball, such as Batting Average, Slugging Percentage and On Base Percentage equate very similarly to CTR, Revenue-Per-Keyword and Average Order Value for any given keyword.

The age of “big data” for marketers had me convinced there are new sabremetrics yet to be discovered or written for search which would provide a tactical advantage for my clients in the search auction. The logical correlation seemed obvious and as with baseball, sabremetrics could help smaller advertisers/ ball clubs compete against the large advertisers/ big market clubs as many of us enjoyed in “Moneyball.”

So I began hurling ideas at the whiteboard in the spirit of Old Hoss Radbourn and his 60 win season (minus the alcoholism and shooting out his own eye) – positives, negatives, extrapolating new stats, correlating stats by macro and micro trends and the findings were quite astonishing… as well as completely inconclusive.

Although it seems SEM is poised to enter the age of advertising sabermetrics, it quickly became more complicated than it was at first glance. The issue lies at the root of aggregating data, as with individual players. An individual player will average between 450-600 at-bats per season based upon games played and order in the lineup; however there is no change in competition besides the pitcher. Keywords, on the other hand, may have millions of impressions and in very different market conditions and at different ranks over a short period of time. Factors such as day parting, budget management, geo-targeting, seasonality, competition and current bidding algorithms make the environment too variable to quantify additional metrics beyond our current capacity. Although it would be easy to assume in the age of big data someone could ‘Moneyball’ the SEM space, it doesn’t appear likely. Actually, it appears nearly impossible.

By this point you are probably asking, “So what is the right approach and aren’t you going to share something insightful?” The answer almost appears too simple, considering the complexity of the issue, but it is as basic as implementing strategic, statistical, and active management.

Bid management needs an active eye – a daily glance ensuring you adapt to ongoing market changes. This means multiple rounds of bid optimizations at different points during the week. The statistical layer includes identifying a KPI (Key Performance Indicator) and leveraging the keywords driving your KPIs. The final, strategic layer comprises a variety of external market conditions such as seasonality, inventory and actualized return around various KPI’s to ensure you are maximizing actions for your given budget.

Sabermetrics may have changed the way GMs manage baseball teams and is even impacting other industries, but ad tech won’t be joining the party any time soon. Instead, we should embrace the fact that our industry only rewards those who actively participate in bid management, and those who succeed will earn their way to the top.

IgnitionOne’s Solution to Bid Management

Although developing new sabermetrics for search may not be a feasible solution, there are other technological approaches to addressing this challenge. IgnitionOne utilizes SPOT, which uses proprietary algorithms based on advanced statistical modeling technologies to accurately forecast keyword performance at varying spend levels. This can help marketers determine how aggressive bids should be based on goals and how to optimize spend by keyword to where it will receive maximum impact. By developing a technology solution which aims to provide insights at a level beyond what any new ‘search sabermetrics’ could provide, IgnitionOne can optimize keywords to achieve maximum performance at unprecedented scale.

Five Minutes with a Search Guru

IgnitionOne’s remarkable technology is backed by a global team of online experts, who are constantly building upon the company’s products through their extensive knowledge and expertise.

Based in the IgnitionOne UK office, Judy Chan has been working in the business of Search for the past 9 years in both agency and direct client roles, making her a seasoned veteran of all things PPC and SEO.

Is Search still a relevant channel for brands?

100%.  Search is the core part of any business.  When analyzing click path analysis, how often can you say search was not path of the click path?

Even if you disagree, test and learn.  It’s the only way to understand this fully. A handful of us are analyzing different attribution models, but not enough of us are moving away from the last-click model.  Search has always been one of our measurable channels.  We need to adapt and analyse attribute models to understand the conversion path.  Even for “brand” activity, yes I agree, tracking a conversion is difficult.  However, there are technology providers out there who can match back the analytical/ engagement data against your keywords to give you better insight and help you make better decisions on running search.

Google Enhanced Campaigns – good or bad for search marketers?

It depends on the vertical, to be honest.  A lot of us have spent the last few years breaking out our accounts, i.e. separate accounts for desktop / tablet / mobile.  We did this because we were able to target each device more specifically and become more granular and relevant in our campaign management. It was fantastic; we could suddenly see how CTR was affected. Google Enhanced Campaigns basically means reverting back to how it was, and managing devices at campaign level, the breakout including mobile, and desktop / tablet.

Regardless, Google has made its decision and we need to act as necessary.

Best piece of advice given to you about analysing search campaign results?

Focus on one target.  Try not to add too many variables, i.e. I want a £10 CPA overall, but I also want to monitor these generic terms and change them manually.  Use a technology to help you manage your time better.  You can then focus on strategy, testing and analysis.

We’re in an industry crammed with acronyms, any personal favourites?

SPOT, which is our predictive optimization technology.

This uses predictive bidding models to automate maximum efficiencies from search campaigns.

Does your work in search affect your personal computer use?

Yes!  I’m so analytical about what comes up and which ads I click on: bad habits.  I tend to make more searches to see who appears also, so my exposure sequence is probably 12 on average.  Geek alert.