Tag Archives: analytics

IgnitionOne Introduces Major Analytics Enhancement

Today we announced a major enhancement to the Digital Marketing SuiteSM (DMS): Analytics 2.0. The new version of the platform offers a new proprietary “Focus Heat Map” to help marketers quickly discern areas of importance based on performance. The new system also increases the speed of reporting by over 50% and adds significant flexibility of analysis of digital marketing and advertising data that marketers need to track and optimize their efforts. With intuitive visualization features, important trends and data points become instantly actionable.

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The offering is foundational for ongoing innovations across IgnitionOne’s analytics solutions from attribution, to media mix modeling, to advanced audience analysis and includes unique differentiated functionality. Key features include:

  • Focus Heat Map, an algorithmic, color-coded schematic showing areas of needed focus, giving marketers a powerful and straightforward way to improve campaign performance.
  • Improved workflow with a simplified interface to see all important data in one place and tools built to tackle huge datasets. Users will save hours of data crunching with new reports and features.
  • Powerful fast reporting with a brand new, charting system delivering data 50% faster. Marketers can also benefit from industry-first insights across attribution models and engagement metrics.
  • Visualization tools that highlight what data is important to identify successes or determine problem areas through robust at-a-glance reporting tools.

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Click here to learn more about Analytics 2.0.

Innovation through a Desktop

Encourage, foster & share – those are, in my opinion, the three most important words when it comes to innovation in a company. Being a digital marketing solutions provider, our office is filled with computers, keyboards, monitors, headphones, servers and more! Being so dependent on computers inspired me to look at innovation like a computer.

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If it weren’t for innovation, IgnitionOne wouldn’t exist. Who would have thought that synchronising media management and optimization, cross-channel attribution and analytics and conversion optimization would create the first ever Digital Marketing Suite (DMS), covering all digital marketing solutions? We did.

Am I overloading my own USB a bit? Of course I am! But there’s good reason for it. Here’s why. First let’s state the obvious: what’s shown to the outside world, what’s on our monitor. IgnitionOne introduced the very first Digital Marketing Suite and are constantly innovating to improve digital marketing returns and efficiency. Another example is IgnitionOne announcing the industry’s first integrated Engagement Optimization solution, offering marketers the ability to optimize ad spend based on behaviours and interests.

So, how on earth do we come up with these things? Where do the ideas come from? How are they tested and worked on to produce a useful solution for our customers? These questions bring us to the chore facets of innovation, the most interesting, opening up the shell of the company and looking at the processor inside.

Encourage, foster and share

A big forté of the company here is our diverse backgrounds. In just 40 employees in Brussels, we have over 12 different nationalities– that is a whole lot of desktop applications, getting the creative juices flowing.  Our office has a very open atmosphere; it’s easy to ask anyone what he or she thinks about a certain topic and you’ll always get an honest answer.  We are even working toward redesigning the office to bring all departments closer to each other, meaning more data will be stored on the RAM instead of ROM and the CPU can create extra bits to work on testing out ideas.

Nurture and encourage growth

We try to increase the number of followers. There is a fun spirit in the office: there is music, some people play ping-pong to relax the mind, people comfortably speak with one another at the lunch table and sometimes it is there that wacky ideas are thought of (our own chef, a hunky masseur for the ladies, or just the idea to have a BBQ together). IgnitionOne creates a comfortable atmosphere that encourages its employees to work hard and produce results.

Share

In the office in Brussels we have monthly “TEDx” sessions. We present new ideas, interesting projects and results from testing, discuss suggestions. This often results in the creation of new ideas. Our TEDx sessions are interdepartmental because we understand that what each of us does has an impact on other’s work. We share the presentations after the sessions for others that are interested too (even internationally) to download, which sometimes spurs new ideas in others, opening new browser tabs.

Better than a computer

Is comparing innovation at IgnitionOne a stretch? Maybe. We avoid the blue screens of death and rebooting our team is as easy as an afternoon coffee. But the important part is the fact that all the components of our system work together like a well built machine to develop and foster new ideas to help our clients achieve their goals.

Insights from an Attribution Queen

A series of interviews will give our readers and IgnitionOne customers a behind-the-scenes look at the people who make up IgnitionOne, exploring their professional roles and what interests them on a personal level. This week, Meghan McDonnell of Attribution Services discusses her background, the evolution of attribution and analytics, and childhood memories and discover why we think she is absolutely royal. 

1. Please introduce yourself

My name is Meghan McDonnell, (Supervisor, Attribution Services). I work in the Client Services team in IgnitionOne’s Atlanta office.

2. What do you do?

I started January 20, 2009 as an Algorithmic Media Analyst (affectionately called a Bid Scientist) on the Advisor team.  The Advisor team is part of Client Services and helps clients who want their Paid Search media spend optimized toward a specific goal.  They are also responsible for weekly status calls with the client to go over performance, as well as providing strategic recommendations and analysis.

3. How did you get involved in attribution and analytics?

I’ve always been really interested in analyzing data.  I graduated with a Mathematics degree and every job I’ve had since has always been extremely focused on data and analysis, mostly in the marketing realm.  Attribution started off as a side project for me, but I have obviously grown into this role.  I loved the idea of incorporating data across multiple media programs and analyzing the process behind getting users to ultimately convert.  There are so many interesting data points involved and it’s only going to continue to get more robust in the coming years.  I’m excited to see where this will eventually take us.

4. Speaking of the coming years: what are your predictions regarding Attribution and Analytics over the next 5 years?

I think it’s only going to get more complicated as more features are added around each digital media channel.  We’ve come a long way toward developing a better understanding of what drives users to convert, but there is still a lot of data that marketers are just getting into, such as on-site metrics (how long they are on the site, what specific pages on the site they visited, at what point did they move from “interested” to “ready to buy”).  These types of metrics are already starting to add value to the attribution process.  I also think that the incorporation of offline data will be crucial to attribution, such as someone searching on their mobile phone for a specific store or product and linking this to this same user going into a store and making a purchase.

5. People around here call you the “Attribution Queen.” How did you get this nickname?

Ha, that’s a good question.  I think Eric Carlyle (our Chief Knowledge Architect)   originally coined the phrase. When I first started working under the Advisor group, IgnitionOne had recently introduced attribution, and Eric tasked me with working on coming up with the reporting logistics and developing a process for our clients.  Since I was one of the first people working on this, he started calling me “Attribution Queen” and the phrase stuck.

6. Can you tell me about the team you work with?

My role now focuses specifically on attribution across all of our clients in multiple verticals and regions of the world. The entire attribution process is very consultative. The practice begins with an initial background brief on the specific client and type of business they have, addressing what business objectives they are ultimately trying to achieve. The team then begins compiling data and reporting in order to get a complete picture of how all of their media channels are working together and how much crossover there truly is (and in most cases, there is quite a bit).

The next step is to take a deeper dive into the data to analyze all of the various marketing components of the conversion paths.  The insights gained from the data combined with the business objectives of that particular client provide a complete analysis, pointing out what is working well (and in what order) and what isn’t.  This helps the client understand not only what type of media mix they should implement but also how they should be attributing their data.

7. How have the solutions evolved since you started working with them?

One of the most important aspects is getting a more comprehensive understanding of what the client is trying to achieve for their business (i.e. driving more new customers to the site, driving higher AOV purchases, etc).  Earlier on, this was something talked about, and on a high level. I think most clients were interested in attribution but didn’t really have a full understanding of what it was and how they could utilize it in a way that would benefit their business.  Now the discussions are much more in depth so we are able to factor in a lot of important information that the data itself was not able to tell us.

Additionally, there are some new attribution reports that I’ve developed to acquire some of the details that were previously missing, such as which types of Display are driving conversions (remarketing, behavioral, etc.) or which types of creative (both display and paid search) are getting users who, say, clicked on an organic search result to finally convert?  Prior to this, the analysis was more focused at the channel level, which is useful, but doesn’t tell us what within these different digital media channels is driving users to convert.  There are so many different levers within each channel that need to be considered when analyzing conversion paths, and we are now able to utilize them  at a much more granular level than ever before.

8. Who is your favorite super hero and why?

Not sure if they are considered “super heroes” but I think I have to go with the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles!  I probably watched that show more than any other show growing up and can’t even count how many times I watched the movie.  It was one of my brother’s favorites as well, so it’s a bit nostalgic for me.

9. Which is the best vacation you ever went on?

I’d say my best vacation was to Ireland.  I am Irish on both sides of my family so it was something that was at the top of my places to visit list.  It was amazing.  I’m actually considering going back next year and running the Dublin half marathon and then taking time to travel around to some of the other European countries.  Keeping my fingers crossed it works out!

10. What is your favorite book?

Outside of Harry Potter?? Haha. I’d probably go with The Bell Jar.  I thought the book did an amazing job of portraying the characters in a way that made it extremely real.  A little disappointed in the movie, but the book I would read over and over.